Women and Global movements – Occupy Savvy interviews Marama Davidson

Women and global movements – Occupy Savvy interviews Marama Davidson

Marama Davidson
Marama Davidson

Please go to the above link where Occupy Savvy interviews Marama Davidson around global movements and the role of women in them.

“In the Occupy Movement in Aotearoa, my small contribution was merely to speak up as a Māori woman and for our group Te Wharepora Hou (TWH). TWH is a group of wāhine Māori who support each other to use our voices collectively and individually as we feel the need to. The imperative to speak up recognises that for too long there has been a silencing of the diverse voices and opinions of Māori women, in spite of the incredible staunch wāhine that have been instrumental to positive change in our communities and our nation. Our purpose is to have a say on all issues that impact on the well-being of whānau (family), hapū (extended family) and iwi (tribes) and our natural living system. By this standard we could provide a critique on every issue under the sun and moon but we do what we can when we can. We do not claim to have any mandate to speak on behalf of all Māori but we surely claim our voices as Māori women, as mothers, as grandmothers and as members of our respective whānau, hapū and iwi.”

Aotearoa responsibilities around indigenous rights – Idle No More

Aotearoa responsibilities around indigenous rights: “Idle No More”IMG_3608

Please go to the above link for my post on indigenous rights at The Daily Blog.

Happy Waitangi Day?

IMG_3608

This is my own personal start to visioning what we are aiming for. It is not exhaustive or structured. Perhaps it will rouse debate or if people don’t like it they could write their own.

Happy Waitangi Day?

When our sovereign authority over our lands and resources is truly honoured;

When a handful of protestors have to take to the streets begging for deep sea oil drilling, fracking and mining to go ahead because our default position starts with protecting our earth Mama Papatūānuku from harm;

When Te Reo our native language is so mainstream that once a year we need an English Language Week;

When all public broadcasters fall over themselves to ensure they pronounce Māori words correctly;

When every learning institution can truly honour the identity of our Māori children;

When our iwi and hapū no longer have to fight to be considered an entity;

When we have stopped killing our babies and are truly living by “He taonga te mokopuna”;

When our young people are deeply rooted in love, identity and belonging that we do not need to launch Marae Youth Courts everywhere;

When if our own people do transgress, we are able to restore justice effectively with our own processes;

When our kids count down the sleeps to celebrate Parihaka Day on the 5th November;

When hapū are the default authority for their foreshore and seabed;

When we all know what Iwi and hapū we belong to, and can call our marae our home;

When local hapū are the permit authority for fishing, hunting, growing and all development on their lands;

When we have a “Crown Seeking Forgiveness” process instead of a Treaty Settlement process;

When we have to dig out our Pakeha elders and Pakeha performance groups because our public ceremonies are lacking without their flavour and authenticity;

When all our primetime broadcasters and morning tv hosts are not racist, at all, to anyone, and actually have talent;

When everyone in Aotearoa is warmly housed, fully fed, truly educated, gainfully employed, holistically healthy and ultimately honoured;

When it is normal habit to go into our bush and make our medicines to heal our own whānau and community;

When we have a Prime Minister who can honour our history of resistance and knows our nation is indebted;

When women are at every decision making cornerstone of this nation, from the speaking platforms and paepae of our marae to the ruling roosts in Parliament;

When our mainstream healthcare funding prioritises our traditional healing experts and approaches;

When our poor neighbourhoods have less prisons and more universities;

When all our people are uplifted and strong and powerful enough that we do not need to abuse alcohol, or drugs, or each other;

When no one would dare make a complaint about their local supermarket airing Te Reo over its loudspeaker;

When the percentage of Māori in jail is way down, and the percentage of Māori gaining Doctorate Degrees is way up;

When we are living our potential as healthy, strong, fit, longer living Maori;

When all our men are stronger and can truly embrace us all as warrior women;

When we have decolonised ourselves to the point where we can embrace love, sexuality, sensuality and passion the way we were all born to do;

……..only then might we truthfully be able to say “Happy Waitangi Day”.

Until that time indigenous resistance and solidarity around the world must continue.
Until then, I will keep the candle burning……………

Marama Davidson
(Te Rarawa/Ngapuhi/Ngati Porou)

IDLE NO MORE – from my Aotearoa perspective

Marama-Davidson-180

Just my own personal ‘what’s on top for me right now’ rant.

1. Ongoing abuse of indigenous peoples by coloniser Canada on that Great Turtle land.
We know this here.

2. Ongoing resistance by those indigenous nations to maintain their sovereignty and responsibility over their lands and peoples. They have never been idle.
We know this here.

3. Canadian colonising government and Bill C45 – latest smack in the face that again oversteps indigenous authority over their lands.
We know this here.

4. Four wahine of that land stand to protect our earth Mama against slaughter and call for indigenous authority. So begins Idle No More.
We have seen such stands here.

5. Chief Theresa Spence of the Attawapiskat Nation begins a hunger strike until Prime Minister Harper agrees to meet with indigenous leaders properly.
We have seen sacrifice here.

6. Today on day 24 of Chief Spence’s commitment, Harper agrees to meet with ‘First Nation Leaders’. We celebrate that for Chief Spence and her peoples. Her solid stand is inspiring, but we are also wary. Because we have seen how those in power do not like to share it.
We know how that works here.

Any opportunity to shine an internationally strong and bright torch on the same issues that our people have been fighting for generations, is an opportunity worth pouring my own energy into. So I am happy to lend my own voice to it, and support others who wish to do so.

A big mihi to our people fighting extraction industries to protect our whenua and our wai. A big mihi to our people revitalising our reo rangatira. A big mihi to our people trying to restore our struggling whanau to their tupuna base which nurtures our mokopuna as the taonga they are. A big mihi to Tuhoe resistance. A big mihi to our gardeners, our songwriters, our poets, our performing artists, our truth academics, our truth researchers and our activists. A big mihi to our ahi kaa back home on all our marae, keeping it warm for us to belong to. A big mihi to our kuia and koro who walked the back of our Mama to parliament, who took the beatings for speaking their Mama tongue, who showed us we have never been idle.

I am livid. I am proud. I am hoha. I am inspired. I am powerless. I am brave. I am angry. I’ am thankful. I feel ripped off. I have aggression in me. I am also in love – with my people here today, those who are gone and the ones yet to arrive. I am in love with my people who have always been strong, awake and feisty.

Time for better humanity. Tama tu Tama ora, Tama noho Tama mate.

Marama Davidson (Ngapuhi/Te Rarawa/Ngati Porou peoples)
#idlenomore

Calling for Indigenous Sovereignty – support the ‘Idle No More’ movement

45006_10151351018421273_828717934_n

Press Release: 28 December 2012

Te Wharepora Hou Māori women’s group is encouraging more support from Aotearoa to a global call for indigenous sovereignty. The “Idle No More” movement is an indigenous uprising which started in Saskatchewan in November. It was a First Nation’s people’s response to the Canadian government pushing through resource legislation without the ‘free, prior and informed consent’ of its indigenous people.

A focal point of the movement is the hunger strike being taken by Chief Theresa Spence of the Attiwapiskat Nation. She is on day 16 of her fasting in a bid to have Prime Minister Harper acknowledge indigenous leadership and negotiate directly with her for better living conditions for the country’s First Peoples.

Marama Davidson of Te Wharepora Hou says “The call for indigenous sovereignty also acknowledges the unique relationship that indigenous people have with their lands, waters and resources. Iwi and hapū here have always upheld our caregiving responsibility over resources. But like many indigenous peoples around the world, we are facing aggressive legislation from our government that will exploit resources in a way that is not sustainable.”

The Idle No More movement seeks to umbrella the indigenous efforts that have been happening around the world for hundreds of years against the devastating impacts of ongoing colonisation. Te Wharepora Hou is encouraging all people to join the peaceful revolution to honour and fulfil indigenous sovereignty to protect the environment. People can join the facebook page “Aotearoa in Support of Idle No More” for further information.
Tonight there will be an outdoor public projection on Waiheke Island which will feature images to tell the story of Idle No More.The images projection will take place in Oneroa Village at 10.30pm directly following a performance by ‘Mihirangi’ at Artworks. Further public projections will take place in Auckland city over the next couple of weeks.

Contact:
Marama Davidson 021 025 88302
Mera Penehira 021 478 194