Love for Parihaka

about-1

Bear in mind
We are still digging you out of our tucked away memories
a knowledge glazed over
by the brush stroke of civilisation

Tupuna deeds
from that time of Parihaka Power
are actions guiding a story
of sassy intelligent resistance
to settle the chronicles
in the genetic waters of Parihaka progeny

Now let’s the rest of us
pick up our hoe
push through those Parihaka waterways
smashing the flow of miseducation
so all our nations mokopuna
can recall Te Whiti and Tohu Kakahi…

with the might and bang of a firecracker!

Marama Davidson
05 November 2012

Women Power – Episode 1 including Marama Davidson

Hosted by Catriona MacLennan – feminist and lawyer.

Tania Pouwhare and Sabrina Muck speak at the beginning about where Aotearoa needs to do more work towards equality for women and other gender issues.

Marama Davidson speaks from 14:00 about the lack of Maori women’s voices in mainstream media and politics.

More activism needed

Marama Davidson
Marama Davidson

Please go to TheDailyBlog here for Marama Davidson’s post on inspiring more activism.

“We all have a responsibility to be politically active.

There – I said it. But the definition for being political is wide ranging. How people manifest their political action is up to them. For me it is simply making that conscious link between our personal lives to the political agenda of the day. From the breakfast we get to eat (or don’t), to the level of comfort (or not) that get we lay our heads on every night. As people have said, there is no longer the luxury of not being an activist of your own making. A new world is coming that will either suffocate us or revive us – it is up to us to make the new world a working one.”

 

Maori control over Maori frameworks – Why I advocate strongly for Kaupapa Maori

Dr Leonie Pihama
Dr Leonie Pihama

Was asked recently why I advocate so strongly for Kaupapa Maori and for Maori control over Maori frameworks. The question has also been asked recently by a Pakeha academic around who gets to determine the boundaries for kaupapa Maori? It’s simple. We do. For the past 200 years the majority  of our land has been stolen or taken through the use of foreign systems, structures & definitions, our language, culture, knowledge, practices and structures have been systematically subjucated, attacked and denied. Our voices and acts of struggle against oppression have, and continue to be actively targeted and suppressed in order to protect the interests of those who have benefited from such actions. All that we have now we have fought for. All that we have held within ourselves we have struggled for. For 200 years we have lived with other peoples definitions of who we are and what is our place on our own land. It is our time to take that space. It is our right to define ourselves, our struggles, our kaupapa, our frameworks. That does not mean we do not need or want allies, it means we do not want to be defined by others who do not know or feel what it means to live as Maori in Aotearoa. Those who work as allies in that struggle know that is the case and work to challenge the systems that continue to deny fundamental rights. It is no secret that many of those I am fortunate to work with advocate Kaupapa Maori is defined and controlled by Maori. That has been clearly articulated for many years. Until there is significant change in the power relationships in this country that way of being can not and should not change. 200 years of others theorising and researching ON us has brought little change in the colonial inequalities that exist. So why would we want that to continue? That’s a more critical question. The answer again is simple. We don’t.

Dr Leonie Pihama (Te Atiawa, Ngati Mahanga, Nga Mahanga a Tairi)